7/25/16

[Photo] Mount Everest in the Eyes of the Galaxy S7 & Gear 360

The Korean climber and explorer Young-Ho Heo has tackled Mount Everest once again, but this time he brought along a Galaxy S7 and Gear 360 to record his journey. When climbing the great mountains of the world, weight is always at a premium, which is why the compact and lightweight Galaxy S7 and Gear 360 are such good companions – they provide the ability to take high-resolution video and photos, even in 360-degrees, wherever you go.

Heo first climbed Everest in 1987, and has since reached the summit several times, including a rare solo climb in 2007. He is also one of the few to have completed the Adventurers Grand Slam, the title given to those who have reached the North Pole, South Pole, and the Seven Summits. The Seven Summits refers to the highest peak on all seven continents, including Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa, Mount Denali (Mt. McKinley) in North America, and Vinson Massif in Antarctica.

“Being a fight against the nature, climbing and adventure is always dangerous. And that’s why our priority in these challenges is to get back home alive,” said Heo. “Wherever you go to Everest, you get to enjoy some spectacular scenery. And with the Gear 360, you get a real feeling of what a crevasse looks like and how high the mountains are.”

The 360-degree video here records Heo and his team’s journey in climbing the tallest mountain in the world. You can see for yourself what Heo means in this stunning 360-degree video taken on the slopes of Everest.




A view of Mt. Everest at the break of dawn.
A view of Mt. Everest at the break of dawn.

Young-Ho Heo and his team climbing up the icy mountains, being careful not to slip.
Young-Ho Heo and his team climbing up the icy mountains, being careful not to slip.

Young-Ho Heo and his team posing for a photo at basecamp.
Young-Ho Heo and his team posing for a photo at basecamp.

A view of the top of the mountain.
A view of the top of Mt. Everest.

A view of Mt. Everest from the other side of the mountain.
A view of Mt. Everest from the other side of the mountain.

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