7/20/16

Young drivers shown the horror of a car crash using Samsung Gear VR headsets

Everyone agrees that car crashes are a bad thing

VULNERABLE DRIVERS are being shown first hand what it is like to be involved in an accident with the help of virtual reality (VR).

Newly qualified drivers in Market Harborough have been treated to a display by Leicestershire Fire and Rescue of the realities of being involved in a car crash from a first person point of view.

The Samsung Gear VR headsets allow young drivers to watch 'themselves' getting medical treatment and being cut out of a smashed up car. One participant reported sympathy pains from an injection, while all participants showed signs of fear such as elevated heart rates on a very literal white knuckle ride.

One in four motorists under the age of 24 is expected to be involved in an accident within the first two years of driving, and rescue services have tried to teach them first hand why it's worth taking extra care on the road.

Joining the officers was a man who was himself involved in a car accident that involved the death of two friends. He described the simulation as "very good", but found it too realistic and asked for it to be turned off.


The Samsung Gear VR was launched in November 2015 and has bordering on 200 apps already. The co-venture with Oculus is designed to work only with Samsung phones.

The headset has, however, been praised for its realism, to the point where Alton Towers recently opened Galactica, a rollercoaster augmented by the use of Samsung VR headsets to simulate a trip into space.

Meanwhile, back in Market Harborough, one participant claimed that she doesn't ever want to get in a car again, while another said that there was "a lot of blood".

Google has promoted its homespun Cardboard VR headset as an educational tool for some time with gimmicks such as virtual school trips to famous art galleries, but this project takes the idea one step further, offering youths a chance to experience something they would never hope to for real.

http://www.theinquirer.net/

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